Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • PhilipC
    Participant
    Post count: 5
    #1301 |

    can anyone recommend a good space heater (or alternative) for practicing at home. Nearly every one of them have termostats that cut off way before 100f so dont work. We’ve found some small heaters without thermostats and they do the job (105f is the record so far) but they’ve been discontinued and they take a long time to get the room up to temperature.

    When I tell people in the electrical shop that I want to heat a room up to 100f they either think I am mad or growing something illegal.

    Any help will be much appreciated
    Phil

    Tee42
    Participant
    Post count: 19
    #4087 |

    Hi Phil,

    I use two small ceramic heaters and manage to get my practice area (large bathroom) to 100-105f. They are made by Holmes (not sure of the models). I put them on opposite ends of the room and though they have thermostats they don’t turn off once it hits 100.

    Lannette

    Gabrielle
    Participant
    Post count: 2885
    #4088 |

    Hi Phil, hi Lannette

    Here is some information from some of my US students who have kindly shared with me what they use to heat their rooms. Lannette I am sure I emailed you some of this info already. :cheese:

    One person uses a Holmes Infrared Quartz heater (feels like a hot lamp but not enough to heat the room to proper hot yoga temps). So he ordered a Vornado electric heater which is supposed to be very powerful and is capable of 105 plus degrees to use in conjunction with the other. He also uses a Honeywell Quick Steam Humidifier which is digital and gets to as high as 65%. It should be turned on a while before class depending on the ambient humidity.

    Another uses a Kenwood and a Holmes electric oil filled heater. Both 1500W and both state cut out thermostats of 95F. However ‘waterwatch’ says temp reaches over 100F. Waterwatch also runs the appliances on different circuits where possible. This is actually information that she shared on another thread.

    And here’s my 2c worth: make sure that you have excellent insulation. If your floor is non-carpeted then you may find it takes longer to heat the space and it may be harder to hold the heat in there. Take a look at what is on your windows. Maybe stick up a layer of plastic (that vinyl kind of stuff they use for restaurant awnings) and this will markedly change the ability to retain heat in the room. Our first home studio we heavily insulated in the roof just over that room and it worked beautifully.

    Although the heater you use is important the insulation and the way you treat the hard surfaces can make or break your ability to reach the right temperature. In that first studio we had a heater that was supposed to get to temp but never did till we covered the cold floor and also lined the window.

    I hope there are others out there who can chime in with other brand names that work for them.

    Namaste
    Gabrielle :)

    fraseram
    Participant
    Post count: 356
    #4090 |

    I am a home practice mad scientist!!! After my daughter I found it too hard to get the studio as often as before… any way what made my practice was two things
    1 the carpet on the floor (and tips gabrielle talked about w/ windows ect)
    2 fans on the ceiling to bring the hot air down
    before I did this my standing was too hot and floor too cold! now…. the fans even out the temp.
    PS it took a bit of practice to find size and where to place so not to feel the breeze. Good luck

    PhilipC
    Participant
    Post count: 5
    #4091 |

    many thanks for all the ideas – I’ll certainly try a few, especially putting a fan to help circulate the air

    All the best
    Phil

    yogurt
    Participant
    Post count: 1
    #5582 |

    First time poster here…..

    Creating a home yoga studio where the temp is 105 degrees has been a topic of research for months.

    One very important thing not discussed is REFLECTIVE INSULATION in your yoga space. This is extremely effective in preventing heat loss. Google Dewar and his invention of the thermos to begin to understand this concept.

    I believe the difference between 90 degrees and 105 degrees is extremely important. There’s just something magical about 105 degrees.

    Also, infrared heaters heat objects directly in front of the heater, in contrast to radiant heaters. I think that’s right.

    Lisafr
    Participant
    Post count: 40
    #5583 |

    We have been practicing ‘not so hot yoga’ at home for 3 months. A week ago we finished our small hot yoga room of 12 square meters: we have insulated the walls and ceiling with polystyrene sheets, covered well with a humidity resistant plastic layer. With the same small 2300 Watt bathroom heater we can easily heat up to a temperature of about 40 degrees Celsius (about 105 Fahrenheit). It was relatively easy to do, it has cost us around 250 dollars and we even can switch the heater to a lower setting now during practice.
    Insulating ceiling and walls really makes a huge difference!

    Lisafr
    Participant
    Post count: 40
    #5584 |

    And we have a small heater that has a ‘continuous heating’ setting which will not stop heating at a certain temperature. We have bought it in the Netherlands. The brand name is Bionaire.

    Gabrielle
    Participant
    Post count: 2885
    #5585 |

    Hi yogurt and Lisa

    Thanks for that very helpful information. It’s great to have a brand for people to investigate.

    The reflective insulation is a very important aspect. In our studios we have covered glass with reflective insulative films by 3M. It reduces loss through the windows. That and double glazing would work a treat!

    Namaste
    Gabrielle :)

    Lisafr
    Participant
    Post count: 40
    #5587 |

    We found a type of reflective insulation that is on one side reflective and on the other side has a thin layer of polystyrene. We have covered a small piece of the wall and the access door where we couldn’t apply the thicker polystyrene.
    As it is very difficult to insulate the floor in our room (the room would become too low!) we have applied the film under the carpet as well. Polystyrene layer down, reflective layer up. The thickness of the material is not more than 3 – 4 mm and is normally used as insulation layer under wood flooring.

    phred7
    Participant
    Post count: 16
    #6462 |

    Wanted to follow up on this. Picked up a patron e3 heater ( http://www.equipmentland.com/products/patron/ )…had to wire my room for 220 but it was already in the wall so it was easy. The heater works great…we put a covering over the window and can get the room up to 95 fairly quickly.

    Big difference in the practice with the heat.

    Gabrielle
    Participant
    Post count: 2885
    #6463 |

    Hi Philip

    That looks like a ‘practice – anywhere’ kinda heater with that handle on the top.

    If you’re willing to do so, I think fellow yogis and yoginis would really appreciate knowing the proportions of the room you’re heating. Then if they’re in the market for a heater they can up or downsize depending on the size of their room.

    Namaste
    Gabrielle :)

    phred7
    Participant
    Post count: 16
    #6470 |

    Sure

    We have a 10 x 10 ft room. Its upstairs in the home…that helps quite a bit. It has a wood floor (that does not help).

    Before we got the patron, it was the in wall “cadet” forced air heater and a standing oil heater (1500 watt) or sometimes 2 that was needed to get the heat above 90 and that took at least an hour to an hour and a half.

    Now the patron will heat to 93-4 on its own in less than an hour and if we put an oil heater in we can get to 98-99.

    Insulating the window was a big help (on cold days you could feel the cold air rushing in from the window…and it is a 2x pane glass). I built a frame out of 1″ wood and pulled some cotton cloth over to make a “Japanese style cover” that works great

    The next step is Carpet

    The patron is, indeed, a portable and can be hauled down to the garage when needed. But you will need to have a special plug installed and have 220v to use the heater.

    Gabrielle
    Participant
    Post count: 2885
    #6487 |

    Hi Philip

    I’ll be interested to read how much more effective your heater operates when you have the carpet down.

    Namaste
    Gabrielle :)

    RachaelB
    Participant
    Post count: 3
    #6774 |

    I have a oil filled radiator (DeLonghi). Does anyone have any thoughts about this heater. I love it for my home and after reading everyones comments, I thought I might add it to the room to help heat. :cheese: I got the Honeywell quickmist humidifier. The room is 12 by 18 maybe. a low 8ft. ceiling. would a ceiling fan help? Is the radiant heater better than one that just blows heat? The room also has a wall heater which is gas. I know I have asked before, and reading all the comments I’m getting more and more ideas. Any feedback would be appreciated:)

    perment
    Participant
    Post count: 1
    #8121 |

    Has anyone tried or is using the Schaefer hot zone portable heater? I am thinking about purchasing this heater for home practice in a 9×11 upstairs bedroom

    suzd
    Participant
    Post count: 4
    #8571 |

    Did you see the Bikram Yoga NYC studio on the Today Show this morning? They use ENERJOY Radiant Heating Systems in their studios & they show the radiant panels. ENERJOY Radiant Panels are the only radiant heaters verified by the Dept. of Energy to save on heating costs. The panels emit radiant heat in the far infrared spectrum No humidification is ever needed; however, dehumidification should be considered. They are installed in many studios…U.S. & worldwide.(Please note: I work with SSHC, Inc. the company that makes the ENERJOY Heaters.)

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